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Dealing With Ebola

HandelontheLaw.com Staff Writer

Tuesday, October 21, 2014



Dealing With Ebola
Ebola Virus

Ebola, the deadly viral disease infecting humans and other mammals in West Africa and spreading to other geographic areas, has created a flurry of precautions by the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American hospitals, ambulance providers and airports.

The gravamen of precautions for laypeople in the U. S. is “heightened awareness”: awareness of symptoms, methods of transmission and prevention. Symptoms of Ebola are: fever; severe headache; muscle pains; weakness; diarrhea; vomiting; stomach pain; unexplained bruising; and unexplained bleeding. If you encounter someone exhibiting those symptoms, call 911 and inform the operator; the operator will probably ask you whether the person has traveled in West Africa over the past 3 weeks, which you should, of course.

Ebola can be transferred to you from an infected person by direct contact through your broken skin or mucous membranes (in your eyes, nose, mouth, etc.) with infected animals or an infected person’s: blood or bodily fluids, including: urine, sweat, saliva, feces, vomit, semen and breast milk; and contaminated objects such as needles or syringes. According to experts, Ebola is NOT spread by air, water, food, mosquitos or other insects. If you have been infected by direct contact, the virus will incubate for 2 – 21 days, though 8 – 10 days is the norm.

There is no miracle drug for curing Ebola (yet). At this point, the cure depends on your own immune system, assisted by supportive clinical care (such as fluids) to treat the symptoms. A person who survives Ebola can have Ebola antibodies protecting him/her from recurrence for 10+ years.

The CDC provides additional ways to prevent Ebola but most or all of those seem connected with travel in West Africa. Consequently, excuse me, but stay out of West Africa for the foreseeable future. Hello!

DO’S AND DON’TS

DO practice “heightened awareness” of Ebola’s symptoms, transmission methods and prevention.

DO watch for symptoms, such as: fever; severe headache; muscle pains; weakness; diarrhea; vomiting; stomach pain; unexplained bruising; and unexplained bleeding.

DO call 911 and so inform the operator if you encounter someone with Ebola’s symptoms.

DO avoid direct contact with infected animals or an infected person’s: blood or bodily fluids, including: urine, sweat, saliva, feces, vomit, semen and breast milk; and contaminated objects such as needles or syringes.

DO understand that Ebola is NOT spread by air, water, food, mosquitos or other insects.

DO understand that if you have been infected by direct contact, the virus will incubate for 2 – 21 days, though 8 – 10 days is the norm.

DO understand that Ebola is cured by your own immune system, aided by supportive clinical care that treat’s Ebola’s symptoms.

DO stay out of West Africa for the foreseeable future.


By Kathy Catanzarite


Source: Kathy Catanzarite - Handelonthelaw.com Staff Writer

Note from HandelontheLaw.com: This article is to be used as an educational guide only and should not be interpreted as a legal consultation. Readers of this article are advised to seek an attorney if a legal consultation is needed. Laws may vary by state and are subject to change, thus the accuracy of this information can not be guaranteed. Readers act on this information solely at their own risk. Neither the author, handelonthelaw.com, or any of its affiliates shall have any liability stemming from this article.





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