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Good Screen Time For Students

HandelontheLaw.com Staff Writer

Monday, October 26, 2015



Good Screen Time For Students
Kids Watching TV

The first time I saw “Sesame Street,” which began broadcasting in late 1969, I was appalled. All that hyper-stimulation, such as the multicolored numbers flying at the screen, seemed unnecessary and addictive. I wondered, “What about learning just for the love of learning? How will students live and learn well without this sensory cocaine once they’re addicted to it?”
Yep – I’m that old.

Flash forward 45 years to our very different modern world. In our computerized world, students are used to being amused and entertained, so teachers are using new technologies in the curriculum to amuse, entertain and educate. In a 2014 Games and Learning Publish Council study, 55% of surveyed educators stated that their students played video games in the classroom at least once per week.

There is also some research indicating that playing video games can increase “brain flexibility” and improve eyesight. Video games are now a valuable educational tool, ideally supporting “good screen time” for children. “Good screen time” is at least unofficially classified as using digital games prompting players to think quickly, analyze and strategize. “Bad screen time,” on the other hand, is passive and consists of watching videos, for example.

How, then, can a child be steered toward “good screen time” that will most benefit him/her in our contemporary world?

First, place a limit on screen time. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no more than 1 - 2 hours per day in front of any electronics. (Gamers will give me a lot of flak for that statement but that statement but I’m quoting Pediatrics experts.)

Secondly, avoid online activities that encourage passive behavior, such as merely watching a video.

Third, seek out educational games covering an assortment of disciplines, from:
- Leapfrog, here: http://www.leapfrog.com/en-us/store/
- National Geographic, here: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/games/"
- Amplify Games, here: http://www.amplify.com/
- Galxyz, here: http://www.galxyz.com/

DO’S AND DON’TS

DO place a limit on screen time.

DON’T focus on activities encouraging passive behavior.

DO seek out educational games covering an assortment of disciplines, from:
- Leapfrog, here: http://www.leapfrog.com/en-us/store/
- National Geographic, here: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/games/"
- Amplify Games, here: http://www.amplify.com/
- Galxyz, here: http://www.galxyz.com/


By Kathy Catanzarite


Source: Kathy Catanzarite - Handelonthelaw.com Staff Writer

Note from HandelontheLaw.com: This article is to be used as an educational guide only and should not be interpreted as a legal consultation. Readers of this article are advised to seek an attorney if a legal consultation is needed. Laws may vary by state and are subject to change, thus the accuracy of this information can not be guaranteed. Readers act on this information solely at their own risk. Neither the author, handelonthelaw.com, or any of its affiliates shall have any liability stemming from this article.





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