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How Can I Become An Egg Donor?

HandelontheLaw.com Staff Writer

Friday, February 07, 2014



How Can I Become An Egg Donor?
Egg Donation

Egg donation is the contribution of a woman’s eggs (also known as “ova” or “oocytes”) for philanthropic and/or monetary reasons so the eggs can be used in human reproduction or biomedical research. In the United States, the donor can be motivated by simply helping another person or by the money she will be paid or both. Egg donation is routinely accepted as an industry in the United States and is controlled by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). Furthermore, the technology of egg donation has developed to such a degree since its introduction in the 1980’s that valid egg donation organizations have the entire process mastered in well-defined steps.

How, then, can you become an egg donor?

First, you should understand that egg donation businesses have developed an ideal donor profile and the closer you are to the ideal, the likelier it is that you will be accepted as a donor. Egg donation businesses want a donor who: is 21 to 30 years old; is customarily considered attractive; is physically healthy; has a good family health history; is intelligent; is well-educated; and has a successful “track record” in that she has previously given birth to a healthy child and/or has donated eggs resulting in a pregnancy. You do not need to exactly match that ideal but the closer you are to the ideal, the more they’ll want you as a donor.

Secondly, find a reputable egg donation organization/business. There are many organizations/businesses eager for human eggs, so shop around and make sure the organization/business is registered with the FDA. The FDA provides a link to review registrations here: FDA Registered Businesses however, it was last updated in 2007-2008, so you will obtain more accurate information by calling 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332) and requesting connection with the department governing “reproductive tissue.”

Third, review web sites and/or call your short list of possible egg donation organizations/businesses. Look for a service that directly provides or arranges all the required screening, matching, and medical procedures for donation. Ask them about their procedures or review them online. Ask about or review your compensation, which typically ranges from $5,000 - $10,000, depending on several factors, including the number of times you have previously donated, whether you belong to a relatively rarer/more desirable ethnic group, etc. Ask about or review payment of related expenses, as a reputable association/business will also pay related expenses for you and for a travel companion (if necessary).

Fourth, when you are satisfied with the answers of an egg donation organization/business, you can typically register with the organization/business and apply to become an egg donor. Some organizations/businesses offer links easy online registration/application, such as the one found here: www.eggdonor.com

Fifth, your application will be reviewed and accepted or rejected.

Sixth, if you are accepted as a donor, you will wait until a recipient – a person or couple wishing to use your eggs for human reproduction – chooses you.

Seventh, after a recipient chooses you, you will be physically and psychologically screened for donation.

Eighth, if you pass that initial screening, you will be medically and genetically screened by a doctor.

Ninth, you will review a contract with the assistance of a lawyer assigned by the organization/business, and the contract will be signed by you and the recipient(s).

Tenth, you will take a series of medically prescribed and supervised medications – some by injection – to stimulate the production of eggs.

Eleventh, the mature eggs are harvested by a doctor in a relatively quick (20 – 30 minutes) vaginal procedure while you are lightly sedated.

Twelfth, after successful retrieval, you will be paid. Your first donation can complete some of the groundwork for a higher-paying future donation, if you wish.


DO’S AND DON’TS

DON’T be intimidated by the process or the people.

DO understand that egg donation businesses have developed an ideal donor profile:
a. 21 to 30 years old;
b. is customarily considered attractive;
c. is physically healthy;
d. has a good family health history;
e. is intelligent;
f. is well-educated;
g. has a successful “track record” in that she has previously given birth to a healthy child and/or has donated eggs resulting in a pregnancy.

DO ensure the organization/business is registered with the FDA.

DO review web sites and/or call your short list of possible egg donation organizations/businesses and ask or review:
a. for a service that directly provides or arranges all the required screening, matching, and medical procedures for donation;
b. about their procedures;
c. your compensation, which typically ranges from $5,000 - $10,000;
d. payment of related expenses.

DO register with the organization/business and apply to become an egg donor, for example, here: www.eggdonor.com

DO understand that your application will be reviewed and accepted or rejected.

DO understand that you will wait until a recipient – a person or couple wishing to use your eggs for human reproduction – chooses you.

DO understand that you will be physically and psychologically screened for donation.

DO understand that you medically and genetically screened by a doctor.

DO review the proposed contract with the assistance of a lawyer assigned by the organization/business and, if the contract is acceptable, sign it.

DO understand that you will take a series of medically prescribed and supervised medications – some by injection – to stimulate the production of eggs.

DO understand that the mature eggs are harvested by a doctor in a relatively quick (20 – 30 minutes) vaginal procedure while you are lightly sedated.

DO expect to be paid very quickly after successful harvesting of the eggs.

Kathy Catanzarite

[Note from HandelontheLaw.com: This article is to be used as an educational guide only and should not be interpreted as a legal consultation. Readers of this article are advised to seek an attorney if a legal consultation is needed. Laws may vary by state and are subject to change, thus the accuracy of this information cannot be guaranteed. Readers act on this information solely at their own risk. Neither HandelontheLaw.com, or any of its affiliates, shall have any liability stemming from this article.]


Source: Kathy Catanzarite - Handelonthelaw.com Staff Writer

Note from HandelontheLaw.com: This article is to be used as an educational guide only and should not be interpreted as a legal consultation. Readers of this article are advised to seek an attorney if a legal consultation is needed. Laws may vary by state and are subject to change, thus the accuracy of this information can not be guaranteed. Readers act on this information solely at their own risk. Neither the author, handelonthelaw.com, or any of its affiliates shall have any liability stemming from this article.





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