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TSA To Toughen Airport Screening

TSA To Toughen Airport ScreeningIn late July 2015, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) decided to toughen U. S. airport screening. The Agency recently decided that it is placing too much emphasis on speed to the detriment of security and is taking remedial steps.

The terms “TSA” and “speed” might seem mutually exclusive if you’ve traveled on a commercial airline lately. I traveled in June/July, waited as long as usual, pulled my self apart as usual, and imagined the TSA screeners laughing at my x-rayed fat rolls as usual. Everything seemed normal.

However, the TSA chief has resolved to retrain screeners for better weapons detection, further limit the agency’s pre-clearance program, conduct more covert detection tests, and closely screen security badges, all of which will presumably slow the security process.

As it turns out, the TSA has good reason to rethink and retool its processes. According to a June 2015 ABC News report, the TSA’s inspector general discovered that airport screeners failed to detect banned explosives and weapons in 67 of 70 tests at numerous airports. I had to drink all my bottled water before going through security but they couldn’t detect someone else’s explosives? Swell.

Though the official report is still being written and is scheduled for release later this summer, TSA administrator Peter V. Neffenger stated, “Efficiency and getting people through airport security lines cannot be our sole reason that makes you take your eyes off the reason for the mission.”

We will review, dissect and link TSA’s full report upon its release.

By Kathy Catanzarite


Source: Kathy Catanzarite – Handelonthelaw.com Staff Writer

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